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Canada Issue

PlaySavvy and Learn

Dreambox Learning
Happy Girl with Computer

There are a few things that keep moms awake at night when it comes to our children’s wellbeing. The first is (literally) the children themselves (remember the sleepless nights in that first year). Then moms are consumed with safety, health and what the kids are eating. One concern we might not have anticipated is their education. It appears around age three when we are suddenly faced with the choice of nursery schools—and in some cases even before that if daycare is a question.

The experts keep telling us that children learn through play. They need to play with toys and with other children to nurture their imagination. They need to have fun and if they can learn while they are playing then it’s a win-win for everyone. Most moms just want their kids to be happy—so if they can do that while learning, then what’s the downside?

Dreambox Learning is an online math game for children in JK–Grade three that’s safe, fun and (according to the experts) can change the way your child learns math. They call it a math environment—and it advances with each student, adapting the curriculum just for them. Unlike other math games that often sacrifice learning for entertainment, DreamBox delivers a deep, individualized learning experience.

Students like that they can personalize their experience by choosing a game character and a theme—pirates, dinosaurs, pets, or pixies—turning their lessons into fun adventures. Parents like that Dreambox allows them to monitor their child’s progress on the parent dashboard. You can read reports on their progress in real time and receive email reports with updates on when their child meets new goals and milestones.

You want your little prodigies to meet their full potential and soak up all that the world has to offer. We know. Just make sure they have fun while they do it.

PlaySavvy Tip
Cut the Deck
Take a deck of playing cards (2 to 10) and cut off the numbers so that only the hearts, clubs, spades, or diamonds remain. When you lay down a card, say the number. Without the number symbol to read, your child has to figure out how many. Depending on the child’s age and ability, play age appropriate card games with the numberless deck (snap is a good one).

Looking for more tips and fun math games to play at home? There are a lot more on PlaySavvy.

First published 2010.09.21